Festival of Quilts 2019 – Entering a Quilt and Show Review

Hello there! Well, I was lucky enough to visit the Festival of Quilts for two whole days this year – my first time ever! – and it was absolutely AMAZING! Sooooo tiring though! I’ve only just caught up on sleep and had time to process it all.

Review of Festival of Quilts - how to enter a quilt and show highlights

If you’ve never been to Festival, it is a complete treat! So much inspiration and shopping. One of my favourite things though is the people! Having a chance to catch-up with all the people I speak to through my phone most days, meeting the shop owners who I love buying from and meeting new people.

This year though, I had the whole new experience of entering a quilt. Eeek! I’ve been saying to myself that I’d enter a quilt for years now, and finally, I can say I have!

I decided to enter Rainbow Twist as it is one of my favourite makes, so far anyway! It felt like a slight cheat, seeing that it had been in Love Patchwork & Quilting, but it had been an epic make and I wanted to share the curved corners with faced-binding.

Rainbow Twist Quilt, Love Patchwork & Quilting Issue 68, pattern by fabricandflowers | Sonia Spence

I had previously entered it to the Modern Category of Quilt Con, and it had not been accepted. This hadn’t been a huge surprise – I wasn’t entirely sure the quilt could be considered modern as it has a very structured, geometric design and an equal amount of pattern vs. negative space – and I still love the quilt. But still!

One of the excellent things about the Festival of Quilts is that it is totally inclusive: all quilts entered are accepted. They have a range of categories that celebrate everyone from Novice to Fine Art. This means that there is an incredible range of quilts to look at – you can literally just spend a whole day wandering around the galleries being amazed by everyone’s workmanship!

Entering a Quilt Show

If you’ve not entered a quilt before, would you like to know a bit more about about the process?

Firstly, you’ll need to get a competition entry form from the Festival of Quilts website. They are available as a download if you would like to do a postal entry or you can enter online. The forms are only available from certain dates each year, so it can be worth signing up to their newsletter list to keep up to date!

I’ll be honest, the form looked a bit intimidating to start with! There are minimum requirements for quilt size and so many different categories to enter that it can be a bit confusing to know which one is the best fit.

For example, with Rainbow Twist, I looked at Modern Quilts, Contemporary Quilts and Traditional Quilts. The form does include a summary for each of the categories, but it still felt like a bit of guess-work!

Rainbow Twist Quilt, Love Patchwork & Quilting Issue 68, pattern by fabricandflowers | Sonia Spence

In the end, despite Rainbow Twist being made with the Drunkards Path block (Traditional) with a modern pattern interpretation (making it Contemporary?!), I decided on Modern: I felt the colours, design, quilting and curved faced-binding would fit best here.

Once you’ve settled on a category, you are ready to fill out the form. There are some standard sections that need to be filled out – Title, Materials, Techniques, is the Quilt for Sale – along with an Artists Statement. Would you like to see what I wrote?

  • Title: Rainbow Twist
  • Materials: Twenty-seven different colours of Kona Cotton
  • Techniques: Machine piecing and quilting.
  • Artists Statement: To use a Drunkards Path template for a fun, modern design with an ombre effect. The twists were quilted differently to the background to highlight them wrapping around each other. Made a faced binding with two curved edges to accentuate the curves of the quilt. IG @fabricandflowers

It’s worth noting, that it is only the Title that is displayed alongside the quilt at the show. The rest of the information is only included within the FoQ Show Guides (this may vary at other shows).

The final step is to make a registration payment for entering, decide how much you want to insure the quilt for (this is very much a personal choice!) and how the quilt will be picked up at the end of the show. As I’m only an hours drive away, I decided to collect it as the flat-rate return postage fee really pushed up the overall cost.

Then, all you need to do is to keep a note of the dates and make sure that the quilt is sent off on time!

After that, you don’t hear anything, which is a bit strange (unless you’re a winner, in which case I would imagine you do?!). So the only way to know if the quilt is hanging is to go see it, or hope to see some pictures of it somewhere online!

Visiting the Festival of Quilts

I’ve been to Festival of Quilts for a number of years now and is something I look forward to each time. Aside from catching up with people, I love to see all the different techniques that have been used and take inspiration from so many different elements. Would you like to see some of my favourite pieces from the show?

*All makers of quilts are credited. If you are the maker and would like me to remove your quilt picture then please let me know. Thank you.

It has to be said that quilting is a funny ol’ business. When you’re stitching away at home you can feel that you’re doing okay. And if you post on social media then you may get some lovely comments. I’ve been lucky enough to be featured in magazines but I still can’t help but feel a massive sense of Imposter Syndrome when going along to a show such as the Festival of Quilts. There are so many talented people out there!!!

All of the quilts on display are absolutely incredible and awe-inspiring! It’s true that not all of them are to my taste or colours (which I’m sure many felt about Rainbow Twist!) but that doesn’t take-away from the workmanship that has gone into each piece and the feeling that I am only at the beginning of my journey.

Some quilts – especially the hand-pieced and needle-turn appliqued ones – I feel are so beyond me that I’ll only be able to do them when I grow up. I couldn’t resist buying a couple of patterns for when I do though!!!

Review of Festival of Quilts - how to enter a quilt and show highlights

Once the show is over and your quilt is returned, pinned to the back is an envelope with judges comments.

I love my quilt, and it doesn’t really matter what others think…..but still, it was lovely to have some positive comments and constructive feedback.

Quilting is always the area that I feel lets me down – I was saying to a friend whilst walking around the show that I can visualise a pattern design but struggle doing the same with the quilting design.

Entering a quilt to Festival of Quilts - Feedback

Looking at some of the quilts at Festival I was just blown away with how some of the creators came up with their designs. Definitely, something to work on!

Bauble II by Tatyana Duffie
Bauble II by Tatyana Duffie

I enjoyed entering a quilt and will definitely look to enter another next year – I get so much inspiration from other peoples entries to inspire my continuing quilting journey and just maybe my quilt will inspire someone else?!

Now, to find some time to turn all of this inspiration into quilts!!!

Speak soon,

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and grey

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Tutorial – Piecing a diagonal quilt back

Have you ever come across the technique of piecing a quilt back diagonally? It’s some cutting magic that means you can use less fabric to make a quilt back by effectively ‘stretching’ it width-ways. Magic, I tell you!

It’s a really efficient way of using fabric (bye-bye buying twice the finished quilt length in backing fabric or spending lots of time piecing a backing together!), especially for those throw sized quilts that measure just slightly bigger than a width of fabric, say 48″-60″ wide.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

I first came across this technique about a year ago when I was making the Wedding Quilt – I had some fabric which was Just Perfect for the backing, but not enough yardage to make the size I needed.

From what I can find, the idea of piecing a quilt back diagonally was created by John and Joan Flynn and works best with quilts that are no more than 1.5x the width of the backing fabric.

There is some maths needed to work out what yardage you will need. However, the quilt sizes that I have most often used this for (based on a backing fabric measuring 44″ wide) are;

  • 50″ x 65″ quilt = 75″ (2.1yds) backing fabric
  • 55″ x 70″ quilt = 93″ (2.6yds) backing fabric
  • 60″ x 75″ quilt = 118″ (3.3yds) backing fabric

If you are using extra wide fabric or making a different sized quilt, you can find a calculator here which does all the hard work for you!

For this quilt, I was looking for a backing that measured 52″ x 72″ and used a piece of fabric measuring 85″ (remember, that you want the backing to be bigger than the quilt to allow for basting and quilting).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Fold the fabric in half diagonally. This is a little fiddly – I would recommend taking your time and trying not to do it when there are kids running around as you definitely need a flat surface!

Cut along the diagonal line, to give two triangular pieces of fabric. You can do this with scissors, but my preferred method is to use a rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat. Place the ruler on the fabric, leaving the fold showing and trim off a slither (about 1/8″) to cut the pieces.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

If you have a slippy floor (I was working on my tiled kitchen floor!), you can slide the mat along the floor under the fabric easily without ruching the fabric. It’s a lot quicker and more accurate than using scissors.

Fold the top fabric back, and then slide the thinnest point of one half away from the other (this makes the fabric wider and shorter).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!
Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Measure to double-check that the fabric is now measuring what you need (remembering to take into account the fabric that you will lose in the seam allowance).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

At one end, pinch the fabrics RST and pin – I generally just use one to keep the fabric in the right position before sewing.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Using a walking foot and at least a 3/8″ seam allowance, sew along the seam. TIP – because the fabric is cut on the bias, be careful NOT to stretch the fabric as you’re sewing (a walking foot helps with this).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Press the seam open.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Square off each of the pointy ends – I like to use the grouting lines in my tiled floor as a groove for my scissors to sit in to achieve a straight (ish) line! It doesn’t need to be accurate at this point, I just don’t want the pointy ends getting in the way when I’m quilting!!!

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

And Ta-Dah! You’re finished and ready to make a quilt sandwich! And the seam is virtually invisible, especially if using a patterned fabric.

I’ve found it to be a great way of stretching yardage, it saves piecing a quilt back and is quick too! I hope you’ve found this useful – do let me know if you have any questions,

Speak soon,

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and grey. Boo!

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To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

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New Patterns – Flexi Sewing Case and Flexi Sewing Kit

I’m so excited to introduce not one but two new patterns today!!!! The Flexi Sewing Case and Flexi Sewing Kit are designed with hand-sewing on the go in mind, making a great travel sewing kit to hold and organise all your sewing supplies for quilting on the go.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

They work brilliantly together, but can also be used individually.

Both patterns have been designed so that you can adapt them to the space you have wherever you may be sewing (car, tent, cafe?!) and with features like a thread dispense and design board so that you don’t lose any block pieces or a spool bouncing off under a table somewhere!!!

Flexi Sewing Case

I’ve talked before about my love of hand-sewing, and as the holidays’ approach, I find myself planning which sewing project to pack and prepare…..along with all the normal stuff that has to be taken!

One of the frustrating things I have always found with using pouches for hand-piecing, is how to lay out my block pieces for sewing whilst also being able to get to my sewing supplies!!!!

The Flexi-Sewing Case includes an integral design board, four divided zippered pockets (so, eight sections!) for organising block pieces, a slip pocket for thread, pencil and other sewing notions. Most importantly, it can be folded in lots of different ways to suit the space that you’re sewing in!

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Folded up, it acts as a pouch so you can easily reach inside each of the pockets to grab what you need.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Unclipped, it folds out allowing you to lay out a block for sewing, flip through each of the pockets as needed and access sewing supplies in the slip pockets.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Or, the design board can be left open and the flap folded over the pockets and clipped in place so that it’s like a book……ideal for sewing in the car (one of my favourite ways to pass long journeys!).

The Flexi Sewing Case pattern is very detailed and includes step-by-step instructions, with lots of pictures and tips including sewing with vinyl, zips and which sewing feet to use for the best results.

Finished Size of the Flexi Sewing Case;
  (Folded) 8” wide x 9.5” high x 1.5” deep
  (Unfolded) 24.5” wide x  19” high

The Flexi Sewing Kit

A mini sewing kit for keeping the essential sewing supplies – a pair of snips, spool of thread and some needles/pins – close to hand.

The Flexi Sewing Kit is ideal for holding all your essential sewing supplies to hand. The specially designed mesh pocket holds the spool and dispenses the thread.

The main feature is the mesh section in the pocket. It allows for the thread to be fed through so that it can be pulled and snipped, without the spool unravelling and bouncing around — like a yarn bowl, for sewists!

Flexi Sewing Kit for sewing on the go!

The optional D-ring allows for the Kit to be clipped to the flaps of the Flexi Sewing Case to keep everything to hand, but could also be easily attached to any pouch.

The pattern guide includes a single or folded version of the Flexi Sewing Kit. Being a small project it’s perfect for swaps and using up precious scraps… so you could make one for every project!

Flexi Sewing Kit - single and double folded options

Finished Size
   Single   – 3.25” wide x 4.5” high
   Folded – 6.5”    wide x  4.5” high

The Flexi Sewing Kit is an ideal quick project for sewists of all levels. The Flexi Sewing Case will take a little more time but the pattern leads you through each stage step-by-step. It is achievable for all sewists who are comfortable using a sewing machine.

If you are unsure of which hardware and sewing supplies to get for each of these patterns, I have created a shopping list of all products I recommend;

I really hope you’ve enjoyed reading a bit more about my inspiration behind these patterns! And if you do make either of them, don’t forget to tag me so I can see!

S x

Today’s sky::: beautifully sunny!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Tutorial – Hidden Zippered Cushion Cover

Hellooo! Making cushion covers (or pillow covers, if you’d rather!) is one of my favourite things to do! They make a great gift and, if you’re a quilter, are a perfect way to use oversized or random blocks you have laying around!

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

My favourite way to do this is by adding a hidden zip – sometimes called a lapped zip. It gives a really neat finish and allows you to finish the cushion in a number of different ways.

Today, I’m going to show you how to sew a hidden zippered cushion cover in just four easy steps.

Materials Needed

  • Pillow
  • Fabric for front (same measurement as the pillow)
  • Fabric for back (same width as pillow x (height + 4″))
  • 1 x zip a couple of inches bigger than your cushion

I’m using the Mini Charm Medallion Tutorial cushion cover, so I’ve got;

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Prepare Fabrics for Zippered Back

Decide on where you would like to position the zip on the back of the cushion – I like to go about a third of the way up, but you can go for whatever you prefer!

Cut the back piece of fabric into two pieces measuring;

  • Bottom Back: One (1) 16.5″ wide x 6″ tall
  • Top Back: One (1) 16.5″ wide x 14″ tall

To give a neat finish inside the cushion where the zip is placed, I like to serge the edges of the top hem of the bottom piece, and bottom hem of the top piece. Alternatively, you can use a zig-zag stitch if you don’t have an over-locker, or leave unfinished if the fabric doesn’t fray too badly.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Take the Top Back, place Right Side Down and fold the bottom edge up by 1.5″. Press. Unfold.

Sew the Zip

Draw a line an inch or so in from one end on the outside edges of the zipper tape. This mark allows us to attach the zip so that it is level on both pieces of fabric.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

NOTE – if you’re using a continuous zipper tape like me, I’ve found using a safety pin stops me from accidentally pulling the zipper pull off!

Place the Top Back cushion fabric wrong side down on a flat surface. Take the zip and place it upside down on the fabric (with the right side of zip facing the right side of the fabric). Match the pencil marks with the side edge, and align the edge of the zip with the bottom edge of the fabric.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Pin in place and, using a zipper foot, stitch approximately a 1/4″ in from the fabric/zip edge.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Before you reach the zipper pull, stop stitching. Making sure that the needle is down, lift the presser foot and gently pull the zipper pull up/down out of the way so that you can continue stitching easily to the end of the seam.

TIP: if you are nervous about moving the zipper pull, an over-sized zipper helps with this! You can keep the zipper pull at one end of the tape, meaning it doesn’t get in the way of the sewing machine foot.

Take the Top Back fabric, placing the zipper right side up and fold the fabric back out of the way (no need to iron!). Take the Bottom Back fabric and place it right side down on the remaining side of the zip, matching the side edge with the pencil mark on the zip. Pin and stitch as before.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

By stitching the zip in from the same end on each side, it means that any fabric creep is going in the same direction!

Press the Bottom back fabric away from the zip. Making sure that the Top Back fabric is not in the way, top-stitch just inside the fabric edge using a zipper foot.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Using the pressed line on the Top Back piece as a guide, bring the fabric down so that the fold covers the zip. Pin in place a few times along the length of the zip.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Starting at one edge of the cushion, and using the overhanging zip as a guide, align the zipper foot with the teeth of the zip and top-stitch (you should find that the foot easily follows the line of the zip).

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Finish the Zipped Cushion Back

Although optional, I like to stitch the fold in position along the edges to stabilise the back of the cushion and to reduce any potential zip issues!

Move the zipper pull back from the edge of the cushion cover. Starting from the Top Back, smooth the fold down and pin in place, before stitching just inside the seam allowance eg. 1/8″. It helps to start above the fold and sew down towards the bottom of the cushion back as this stops any puckering.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Trim any zipper tape that is overhanging the cushion back from each edge, once the fold is secured.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Trim the cushion back to the correct height – if using a patterned fabric, this gives the chance to play with pattern placement!

Join the Cushion Front and Covered Zip Back

Remember, if you are using a directional print to make sure that the hidden zip flap is placed correctly

How to Finish a cushion with binding

Place the front and back fabrics Wrong Sides Together. Pin through both layers at each corner, before adding a couple of pins along each edge.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Stitch all around the edge of the cushion cover, just inside the seam allowance that you will be using for the binding eg. 1/8″ if you will be using a 1/4″ binding.

Add binding to finish, as you would for a quilt, attaching binding to the front of the cushion and folding over to the back.

How to Finish a Standard Cushion (no edging)

To make a normal cushion – one without any fancy edging! – pull the zip towards the middle of the zipper tape, so that you will be able to turn it inside out when finished.

Tutorial for an easy sew hidden zipper cushion cover in four steps

Place the front and back cushions Right Sides together. Pin through both layers at each corner, before adding a couple of pins along each edge.

Sew all around the edge of the cushion – if you have a quilted panel, you will probably need to use a 1/4″ seam allowance. If you would like to finish the inside edges, you can go around each of the sides with a zig-zag/serger to stop any fraying. Turn inside out before placing a cushion pad inside.

I hope you’ve found this useful! Let me know if you have any questions.

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast, grey and rain. Meh!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

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How to Plan a Quilt Colour Scheme

So, I started writing instructions for the Mini Charm Medallion tutorial, when it occurred to me: if you have been reading through the #QuiltingTheory series, and about to start your first project, you might be wondering where to start with fabrics and colours.

Today we’re going to look at how to identify the colours and style that you like, using a free app to ‘colour in’ a quilt plan and translating that into fabric.

How to plan a quilt colour scheme using a digital colouring app with tutorial for the Mini Charm Medallion by fabricandflowers

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

How to Choose Colours for a Quilt

I remember back when I started quilting, one of the things I was most fascinated/apprehensive about was putting colours together…..it seemed like a magical art (and sometimes, still does!)!

There is lots of information available on Colour Theory – and I am far from an expert.

Planning colour schemes for quilts by fabricandflowers

If you want to learn more about Colour Theory, I can highly recommend the Quilt Colour Workshop. It is a great book which talks you through the colour wheel, colour relationships and tonal relationships, as well as including some fabulous projects!

Having said all that, my top tip would be to go with what makes your heart sing! Try not to get too bogged down by the rules of what should and shouldn’t go together. Have a look on Pinterest/Instagram to see what quilts jump out at you and really look at them;

  • Do they have similar designs, use of colour, or fabric/colour combinations?

Once you’ve identified some common elements, try introducing some of these to your quilt. With each project, you will become more colour confident and soon will be throwing fabrics together with reckless abandonment!!!

For me, I love making projects that are high contrast (normally between background and ‘feature’ fabrics) using textured/tone on tone fabric and quite geometric designs.

Collage of quilt projects by fabricandflowers

To be honest, I didn’t really think I had a preference until I put together a collage of makes for a magazine – at which point I realised there were quite a few similarities!!! – so it’s quite a good exercise.

Choosing Fabrics and Colours

Pre-cuts/bundles are a great starting point if you are new to quilting as they provide a range of colours and patterns that play together nicely. To make a bigger project – such as the Mini Charm Medallion Tutorial – you can add coordinating background fabric.

How to plan a quilt colour scheme using a digital colouring app with tutorial for the Mini Charm Medallion by fabricandflowers

If you are using a candy charm pack, it’s a good idea to lay out all the squares to get an idea of what colours you have – quite often there will be duplicate prints within the pack.

Planning a Quilt Colour Scheme

One of the tools I often use when planning a quilty project is Recolor – Coloring Book, available as a free download through the Apple iTunes store.

It allows you to upload your own images to colour in. It’s a great way of quickly trying out different colour combinations to see what works!

If you’ve not used it before, here is what you will need to do after downloading the app;

You can now open the Planner Sheet image and chose ‘continue colouring’.

Tutorial for how to use a free colouring app for planning a quilt colour scheme and layout by fabricandflowers

In the bottom left-hand corner of the screen, you will see some little coloured dots – if you click on this, you can select the style of colours to use. Images tend to automatically open with ‘gradient’ whereas I prefer ‘solids’.

How to plan a quilt colour scheme using a free digital colouring app with tutorial by fabricandflowers

Chose the colour that you would like to use from the bottom menu (you can swipe across the bottom to choose different colours) and a little white dot will appear in the colour that you have chosen. Now, place a finger on the section of the picture where you would like that colour to go. And play until your heart’s content!

Colour Scheme Plans in Action

Having looked through the candy charm pack of fabrics, using the planner sheet (sign up to my Newsletter for a free copy) and having had a play with different colour layouts, I had decided on a rainbow center and outside, and a neutral second border (as there were conveniently 14 neutral squares in my pack!).

However, what looks good on the screen, sometimes still needs a little fine tuning when it comes to fabric! My initial pull just wasn’t quite right…

How to plan a quilt colour scheme using a digital colouring app with tutorial for the Mini Charm Medallion by fabricandflowers

I was really happy with the light-dark (tonal) graduation that I had with the purple and blue. The orange and yellow didn’t work as well, for me: the orange was too dark and the yellow jarred against the green. So I tried a couple of other squares and was much happier with the final layout.

Join me for the next post when we will be starting the Mini Charm Medallion Cushion Tutorial – if you would like to take part, all you need is one candy charm pack (or 41 2.5″ squares) and one fat quarter for the background.

And if you would like to try out your colour schemes, please join my Newsletter and get sent a free copy of the Quilt Planner sheet.

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and raining. Boo!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

How to plan a quilt colour scheme using a free digital colouring app for the Mini Charm Medallion by fabricandflowers