6 Tips – How to Sew Zippers Easily and Quickly

When I first started sewing, I loved the idea of sewing zippers but was scared of actually doing it! And it seemed to be one of those things that lots of other sewists mentioned as being horrible which made it feel like an even more impossible task!

Today, I would like to share with you all the tips and tricks I have learnt over the years because actually, zippers are nowhere near as scary as I thought and there are so many fun projects to be made!

6 tips for how to insert zippers easily and quickly in to projects such as bags, pouches and cushions

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

Feel the zipper fear, and do it anyway!

When I first started contemplating sewing with zippers, the main worries I had were;

  1. How do I sew the zipper in place when there’s a big ol’ metal pull that keeps pushing the sewing machine foot away?
  2. Am I going to damage my machine by sewing over something I shouldn’t?
  3. How am I meant to control the zipper when it’s been unzipped and is all flimsy and flexible?

And the honest truth is that yes! I have sometimes broken a needle on my machine. However, by following these steps this shouldn’t happen to you and you’ll be making lots of pouches and bags before you know it!

These tips will work best with regular, nylon zips for craft/home decorating projects (rather than dressmaking where you often need to use specifically sized zips) although many of the techniques are transferable.

If you are looking to buy some zippers, I use this shop as it has the most amazing range of colours and zip sizes available!

1. Use a Zipper that is too Long

When you buy zippers, it can be a bit confusing to know which bit to measure! When a pattern asks for a 7″ zipper, this refers to the length of the teeth from beginning to end not the total length of the tape.

By using a zipper that is too long for your project, the zip will overhang the material.

This allows you to leave the zip closed whilst sewing in both sides. This makes the zip a lot more stable to sew in, as the zip pull does not get in the way and you do not need to worry about moving it past the zipper foot mid-sewing.

Once the zip is sewn in place, move the zip in towards the centre of the zip. I find it helpful to stitch across both ends of the zip (within the seam allowance) either by hand or with a machine to stop the zip being pulled off accidentally.

Alternatively, you can use a safety pin to keep the ends together.

Finally, trim the zip to size (do not use fabric scissors for this job!) and the raw edges of the zipper will be eventually be hidden in the seam allowance.

Note: do not try this with metal zips as they can not be trimmed so easily!

Great tutorials to try this technique with are;

2. Add Zipper Tabs to the End

Depending on the pattern, you can add tabs to one or both ends of the zipper.

If you add a tab at both ends, it helps to stabilise the zip so that even when unzipped, it is less flimsy making it easier to sew.

This is one of my favourite ways of adding a zipper tab as it removes all the bulk from the end of the zip, making it easier to finish projects off neatly.

Good tutorials to try this technique with, in combination with a longer zipper are;

3. Use a Zipper foot

Most sewing machines will come with a zipper foot and this really does help to make the whole job a lot easier!

On some machines, you will need to move the foot to position the needle to the left or the right. On others, you can reposition the needle (see my post here for details).

It is worth familiarising yourself with the zipper foot and knowing which part of the foot to align with the fabric for 1/4″ seam allowance and for topstitching.

6 tips for how to insert zippers easily and quickly in to projects such as bags, pouches and cushions

For example, with my machine (a Janome Horizon), I keep the needle in the central position for sewing the zipper in position, aligning the edge of the foot with the edge of the fabric.

When I’m top-stitching, I like to shift the needle position (to whichever side I’ve edge matched), normally to a 1.5 (left side) or 7.5 (right side) so that the stitching is close to the fabric/zip seam.

4. Positioning the zipper

I always like to align my fabrics first, before sandwiching the zipper between them. Others prefer to layer fabric, zip, fabric. I would try both ways to find what works for you and gives the best result.

Personally, I find that by layering my fabrics first (especially if I’m making a quilted pouch and have got the additional wadding layers), I can put a pin along the top edge to make sure that the fabrics stay aligned whilst I’m positioning the zipper.

I normally only use one pin to hold the zip in position – near the top of the seam – always inserted at a right angle to the fabric.

Sometimes, I will use wonder-clips to keep the layers together, depending on what fabric I’m using.

Once I’ve secured the zipper in position with a few stitches, I will remove the pin and sew the entire zip, readjusting the zipper tape as needed.

TIP – always make sure that the needle position is down if you stop stitching mid-zip to rearrange the fabrics/reposition the zip pull!

5. Sew Both Sides from the Same End

When I discovered this trick, it was a game-changer! Always sew each side of the zip from the same end eg. from the bottom/top of the zip.

This means that if there is any fabric/zip creep, it will all go in the same direction, and you shouldn’t end up with any misaligned fabrics/zips.

If you combine this with the next tip (marking the zipper), you should nearly always have perfect zips (I say nearly, because there will always be one that won’t behave!).

6. Mark the zipper

Finally, I like to mark my zipper.

The first side is sewn in as described above. However, before sewing the second side in, I like to transfer the beginning and end of the zip/fabric on the first side over.

6 Zipper Tips - marking the zip for easy zip insertion.

To do this, you can either fold the zip in half or lay it flat. Mark the starting/end position of the fabric with either a pin or pencil (making sure that the mark is within the seam allowance).

Use this mark to match the outer and lining fabrics on the zip.

Start stitching from the same end as for the previous side and sew along the seam – keeping the fabric under tension if needed until you reach the end.

6 tips for how to insert zippers easily and quickly in to projects such as bags, pouches and cushions

And there we are! All my top tips for sewing in zips. I hope you’ve found it useful?!

If you’re looking to try some different projects, please do check out my zippy patterns for the (Not So) Little Zippy Pouch and Flexi Sewing Case which make great project bags for sewing on the go.

Don’t forget to check out this shop for an amazing range of zippers!

And do let me know if you have any questions or tips that you can share,

S x

Today’s sky::: mostly grey with a fair bit of rain. Autumn has arrived!!!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

6 tips for how to insert zippers easily and quickly in to projects such as bags, pouches and cushions

Upcycled Tin Craft Tutorial – Mini Sewing Kit

The other day, Mr f&f left an empty tin container on the side for me to keep sewing supplies in. I think he thought I was just going to stick some pins in it, but Oh No! This hinged tin was too good not to craft into something special!

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

I don’t know if you’ve seen these tins before? They’re very similar in size to an Altoid tin, but slightly deeper at 1″, which means that you can fit a spool of thread in easily, making it ideal for a mini travel sewing kit!!!

Would you like to see how I made it?

What you will need

Ready? Let’s get started!

Prepare the tin

To clear out any excess wax, I wiped around the inside of the tin with a cloth. Pour in some boiling water and let it sit for a little while. Tip the water out, give it a wipe and we’re good to go!

Take a piece of wadding measuring approximately 5″ x 4″. Apply superglue over the tin lid, paying special attention to the rim. You should find that you can ease the wadding around the corners without having to do any folding. Once it’s dry, you can trim any excess wadding so that it is level with the edge of the lid.

This tin has a piece of coated plastic just inside the lid. To take this out you will need something fine and flexible (I found this cake tester to be ideal – as you can see, it’s had a lot of use in its time!).

I didn’t bother to remove the piece of double-sided tape that was left behind as it will eventually be covered back up!

Make the Patchwork Cover for the Tin Lid

To make the cover, and achieve a neat finish around the edge of the tin, I made a patchwork top. For this you will need to cut;

  • Centre Panel (1) 3.5″ x 2.5″
  • Wadding (1) 3.5″ x 2.5″ (optional)
  • Edge panels (2) 3.5″ x 1.75″ and (2) 5″ x 1.75″

For this, you could use one type of fabric, or get creative and patchwork a mini block! I’ve got a bit of a thing for flying geese at the moment, so I chose to make the centre panel out of three small units;

  • Flying geese (3) 2.5″ x 1.5″ rectangles
  • Background (6) 1.5″ squares

Take the centre panel, place on a piece of wadding and quilt if desired and place the smallest edge panels Right Sides Together with the top and bottom edges. Stitch using a standard seam 1/4″ seam allowance.

Press the edge panels away from the centre. Take the two remaining pieces and place Right Sides Together on each side. Repeat as before, making sure to only secure the stitches on the edge that will be at the front of the tin (as we will be undoing some of the stitches on the seam that will be nearest to the hinge).

[Optional] Topstitch around the edge of the centre panel.

Use a quilting ruler and draw a 1.25″ square in each corner using a pencil on the Wrong Side of your fabric.

For the top edge of the panel – that will be positioned around the hinge – use a seam ripper to undo a few stitches to give an opening of c. 1/2″.

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

Fold the edge strip down by 1/2″ (so that the fabric edge is roughly level with the squares that you’ve drawn). Finger press and stitch in position.

Box the corners by folding the fabric diagonally Right Sides Together. Pin, and stitch along the pencil line. Trim excess fabric to leave a 1/4″ seam allowance. Repeat for the remaining corners.

Take the tin, and starting at the back by the, place some Elmers glue along the lip of the edge.

Place the folded edge of the fabric on top – making sure to cover the wadding – and hold in position to secure. Leave for a few minutes to dry.

Apply glue to the top of the tin (I have only applied it where there is more than one layer of fabric to minimise the glue coming through and making the fabric stiff) and gently pull the cover over the top of the tin.

Gently stretch the cover into position. Fold the fabric over the edges of the tin and use wonder clips to hold in position whilst it dries.

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

Once dried, remove the clips, apply superglue along the inside of the lid rim and press the fabric back down into position (being careful not to get your fingers stuck too…..just saying!)

Making the Needle Keeper and Pincushion

  • Lining fabric (1) 5″ x 6″
  • Pincushion fabric (1) 1.5″ x 2.25″
  • Needle minder felt (1) 1.25″ x 1.75″

Using scissors, trim around the edge of the cardboard from the lid (say 1/16″ – enough so that when it is wrapped with fabric, we will still be able to fit it back in!).

Take the largest piece of fabric and place the card in the centre. Fold the fabric around the card and finger press to give you an idea of the size. Remove the card and place on top of a piece of wadding.

Take the felt for the needle keeper and place on the lining fabric (mine is roughly 1/2″ in from each edge). Stitch along one of the long edges to secure in position.

To make the pincushion, fold each edge under by 1/4″. Press. Place on the lining fabric (again, mine is roughly 1/2″ in from each edge), pin in place and edge-stitch around, leaving a gap for stuffing.

Gently stuff the pincushion with some wadding scraps. Close the opening by stitching around the edge of the pincushion – you may find using a zipper foot will help you to easily move around the stuffing!

Finishing your Mini Sewing Kit

Fold back the edges of the lining to trim the wadding to size. Apply super glue to one side of the cardboard and press the lining in place. Fold the edges of the fabric over to stretch into position and wonder clip in place whilst it dries.

Once dry, glue the fabric to the wrong side of the card to keep in position. Finally, apply glue to the inside of the tin lid, push the lining in and hold in position.

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

If desired, you can cover the bottom of the tin with some felt and presto – a pretty little sewing kit upcycled from a hair wax tin!!!! I’m not sure that anyone will ever know?!

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

Can’t wait for Mr f&f to finish the next tin…….these will make great gifts for any sewists in your life, although if you left off the pincushion and needle keeper off, it could make a lovely trinket box too?!

Hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial – do let me know if you make one!

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast. Grey and very rainy!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

DIY craft tutorial for how to upcycle a tin, similar to an Altoids Mint box, into a mini travel sewing kit. Ideal make for Christmas, Birthday or Swap gift.

Festival of Quilts 2019 – Entering a Quilt and Show Review

Hello there! Well, I was lucky enough to visit the Festival of Quilts for two whole days this year – my first time ever! – and it was absolutely AMAZING! Sooooo tiring though! I’ve only just caught up on sleep and had time to process it all.

Review of Festival of Quilts - how to enter a quilt and show highlights

If you’ve never been to Festival, it is a complete treat! So much inspiration and shopping. One of my favourite things though is the people! Having a chance to catch-up with all the people I speak to through my phone most days, meeting the shop owners who I love buying from and meeting new people.

This year though, I had the whole new experience of entering a quilt. Eeek! I’ve been saying to myself that I’d enter a quilt for years now, and finally, I can say I have!

I decided to enter Rainbow Twist as it is one of my favourite makes, so far anyway! It felt like a slight cheat, seeing that it had been in Love Patchwork & Quilting, but it had been an epic make and I wanted to share the curved corners with faced-binding.

Rainbow Twist Quilt, Love Patchwork & Quilting Issue 68, pattern by fabricandflowers | Sonia Spence

I had previously entered it to the Modern Category of Quilt Con, and it had not been accepted. This hadn’t been a huge surprise – I wasn’t entirely sure the quilt could be considered modern as it has a very structured, geometric design and an equal amount of pattern vs. negative space – and I still love the quilt. But still!

One of the excellent things about the Festival of Quilts is that it is totally inclusive: all quilts entered are accepted. They have a range of categories that celebrate everyone from Novice to Fine Art. This means that there is an incredible range of quilts to look at – you can literally just spend a whole day wandering around the galleries being amazed by everyone’s workmanship!

Entering a Quilt Show

If you’ve not entered a quilt before, would you like to know a bit more about about the process?

Firstly, you’ll need to get a competition entry form from the Festival of Quilts website. They are available as a download if you would like to do a postal entry or you can enter online. The forms are only available from certain dates each year, so it can be worth signing up to their newsletter list to keep up to date!

I’ll be honest, the form looked a bit intimidating to start with! There are minimum requirements for quilt size and so many different categories to enter that it can be a bit confusing to know which one is the best fit.

For example, with Rainbow Twist, I looked at Modern Quilts, Contemporary Quilts and Traditional Quilts. The form does include a summary for each of the categories, but it still felt like a bit of guess-work!

Rainbow Twist Quilt, Love Patchwork & Quilting Issue 68, pattern by fabricandflowers | Sonia Spence

In the end, despite Rainbow Twist being made with the Drunkards Path block (Traditional) with a modern pattern interpretation (making it Contemporary?!), I decided on Modern: I felt the colours, design, quilting and curved faced-binding would fit best here.

Once you’ve settled on a category, you are ready to fill out the form. There are some standard sections that need to be filled out – Title, Materials, Techniques, is the Quilt for Sale – along with an Artists Statement. Would you like to see what I wrote?

  • Title: Rainbow Twist
  • Materials: Twenty-seven different colours of Kona Cotton
  • Techniques: Machine piecing and quilting.
  • Artists Statement: To use a Drunkards Path template for a fun, modern design with an ombre effect. The twists were quilted differently to the background to highlight them wrapping around each other. Made a faced binding with two curved edges to accentuate the curves of the quilt. IG @fabricandflowers

It’s worth noting, that it is only the Title that is displayed alongside the quilt at the show. The rest of the information is only included within the FoQ Show Guides (this may vary at other shows).

The final step is to make a registration payment for entering, decide how much you want to insure the quilt for (this is very much a personal choice!) and how the quilt will be picked up at the end of the show. As I’m only an hours drive away, I decided to collect it as the flat-rate return postage fee really pushed up the overall cost.

Then, all you need to do is to keep a note of the dates and make sure that the quilt is sent off on time!

After that, you don’t hear anything, which is a bit strange (unless you’re a winner, in which case I would imagine you do?!). So the only way to know if the quilt is hanging is to go see it, or hope to see some pictures of it somewhere online!

Visiting the Festival of Quilts

I’ve been to Festival of Quilts for a number of years now and is something I look forward to each time. Aside from catching up with people, I love to see all the different techniques that have been used and take inspiration from so many different elements. Would you like to see some of my favourite pieces from the show?

*All makers of quilts are credited. If you are the maker and would like me to remove your quilt picture then please let me know. Thank you.

It has to be said that quilting is a funny ol’ business. When you’re stitching away at home you can feel that you’re doing okay. And if you post on social media then you may get some lovely comments. I’ve been lucky enough to be featured in magazines but I still can’t help but feel a massive sense of Imposter Syndrome when going along to a show such as the Festival of Quilts. There are so many talented people out there!!!

All of the quilts on display are absolutely incredible and awe-inspiring! It’s true that not all of them are to my taste or colours (which I’m sure many felt about Rainbow Twist!) but that doesn’t take-away from the workmanship that has gone into each piece and the feeling that I am only at the beginning of my journey.

Some quilts – especially the hand-pieced and needle-turn appliqued ones – I feel are so beyond me that I’ll only be able to do them when I grow up. I couldn’t resist buying a couple of patterns for when I do though!!!

Review of Festival of Quilts - how to enter a quilt and show highlights

Once the show is over and your quilt is returned, pinned to the back is an envelope with judges comments.

I love my quilt, and it doesn’t really matter what others think…..but still, it was lovely to have some positive comments and constructive feedback.

Quilting is always the area that I feel lets me down – I was saying to a friend whilst walking around the show that I can visualise a pattern design but struggle doing the same with the quilting design.

Entering a quilt to Festival of Quilts - Feedback

Looking at some of the quilts at Festival I was just blown away with how some of the creators came up with their designs. Definitely, something to work on!

Bauble II by Tatyana Duffie
Bauble II by Tatyana Duffie

I enjoyed entering a quilt and will definitely look to enter another next year – I get so much inspiration from other peoples entries to inspire my continuing quilting journey and just maybe my quilt will inspire someone else?!

Now, to find some time to turn all of this inspiration into quilts!!!

Speak soon,

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and grey

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

Tutorial – Piecing a diagonal quilt back

Have you ever come across the technique of piecing a quilt back diagonally? It’s some cutting magic that means you can use less fabric to make a quilt back by effectively ‘stretching’ it width-ways. Magic, I tell you!

It’s a really efficient way of using fabric (bye-bye buying twice the finished quilt length in backing fabric or spending lots of time piecing a backing together!), especially for those throw sized quilts that measure just slightly bigger than a width of fabric, say 48″-60″ wide.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

NOTE: This post may contain affiliate links and you can read my full disclosure privacy policy here. Thank you.

I first came across this technique about a year ago when I was making the Wedding Quilt – I had some fabric which was Just Perfect for the backing, but not enough yardage to make the size I needed.

From what I can find, the idea of piecing a quilt back diagonally was created by John and Joan Flynn and works best with quilts that are no more than 1.5x the width of the backing fabric.

There is some maths needed to work out what yardage you will need. However, the quilt sizes that I have most often used this for (based on a backing fabric measuring 44″ wide) are;

  • 50″ x 65″ quilt = 75″ (2.1yds) backing fabric
  • 55″ x 70″ quilt = 93″ (2.6yds) backing fabric
  • 60″ x 75″ quilt = 118″ (3.3yds) backing fabric

If you are using extra wide fabric or making a different sized quilt, you can find a calculator here which does all the hard work for you!

For this quilt, I was looking for a backing that measured 52″ x 72″ and used a piece of fabric measuring 85″ (remember, that you want the backing to be bigger than the quilt to allow for basting and quilting).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Fold the fabric in half diagonally. This is a little fiddly – I would recommend taking your time and trying not to do it when there are kids running around as you definitely need a flat surface!

Cut along the diagonal line, to give two triangular pieces of fabric. You can do this with scissors, but my preferred method is to use a rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat. Place the ruler on the fabric, leaving the fold showing and trim off a slither (about 1/8″) to cut the pieces.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

If you have a slippy floor (I was working on my tiled kitchen floor!), you can slide the mat along the floor under the fabric easily without ruching the fabric. It’s a lot quicker and more accurate than using scissors.

Fold the top fabric back, and then slide the thinnest point of one half away from the other (this makes the fabric wider and shorter).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!
Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Measure to double-check that the fabric is now measuring what you need (remembering to take into account the fabric that you will lose in the seam allowance).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

At one end, pinch the fabrics RST and pin – I generally just use one to keep the fabric in the right position before sewing.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Using a walking foot and at least a 3/8″ seam allowance, sew along the seam. TIP – because the fabric is cut on the bias, be careful NOT to stretch the fabric as you’re sewing (a walking foot helps with this).

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Press the seam open.

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

Square off each of the pointy ends – I like to use the grouting lines in my tiled floor as a groove for my scissors to sit in to achieve a straight (ish) line! It doesn’t need to be accurate at this point, I just don’t want the pointy ends getting in the way when I’m quilting!!!

Picture Tutorial for piecing a quilt back diagonally, a great way of stretching fabric further!

And Ta-Dah! You’re finished and ready to make a quilt sandwich! And the seam is virtually invisible, especially if using a patterned fabric.

I’ve found it to be a great way of stretching yardage, it saves piecing a quilt back and is quick too! I hope you’ve found this useful – do let me know if you have any questions,

Speak soon,

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and grey. Boo!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

New Patterns – Flexi Sewing Case and Flexi Sewing Kit

I’m so excited to introduce not one but two new patterns today!!!! The Flexi Sewing Case and Flexi Sewing Kit are designed with hand-sewing on the go in mind, making a great travel sewing kit to hold and organise all your sewing supplies for quilting on the go.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

They work brilliantly together, but can also be used individually.

Both patterns have been designed so that you can adapt them to the space you have wherever you may be sewing (car, tent, cafe?!) and with features like a thread dispense and design board so that you don’t lose any block pieces or a spool bouncing off under a table somewhere!!!

Flexi Sewing Case

I’ve talked before about my love of hand-sewing, and as the holidays’ approach, I find myself planning which sewing project to pack and prepare…..along with all the normal stuff that has to be taken!

One of the frustrating things I have always found with using pouches for hand-piecing, is how to lay out my block pieces for sewing whilst also being able to get to my sewing supplies!!!!

The Flexi-Sewing Case includes an integral design board, four divided zippered pockets (so, eight sections!) for organising block pieces, a slip pocket for thread, pencil and other sewing notions. Most importantly, it can be folded in lots of different ways to suit the space that you’re sewing in!

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Folded up, it acts as a pouch so you can easily reach inside each of the pockets to grab what you need.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Unclipped, it folds out allowing you to lay out a block for sewing, flip through each of the pockets as needed and access sewing supplies in the slip pockets.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.

Or, the design board can be left open and the flap folded over the pockets and clipped in place so that it’s like a book……ideal for sewing in the car (one of my favourite ways to pass long journeys!).

The Flexi Sewing Case pattern is very detailed and includes step-by-step instructions, with lots of pictures and tips including sewing with vinyl, zips and which sewing feet to use for the best results.

Finished Size of the Flexi Sewing Case;
  (Folded) 8” wide x 9.5” high x 1.5” deep
  (Unfolded) 24.5” wide x  19” high

The Flexi Sewing Kit

A mini sewing kit for keeping the essential sewing supplies – a pair of snips, spool of thread and some needles/pins – close to hand.

The Flexi Sewing Kit is ideal for holding all your essential sewing supplies to hand. The specially designed mesh pocket holds the spool and dispenses the thread.

The main feature is the mesh section in the pocket. It allows for the thread to be fed through so that it can be pulled and snipped, without the spool unravelling and bouncing around — like a yarn bowl, for sewists!

Flexi Sewing Kit for sewing on the go!

The optional D-ring allows for the Kit to be clipped to the flaps of the Flexi Sewing Case to keep everything to hand, but could also be easily attached to any pouch.

The pattern guide includes a single or folded version of the Flexi Sewing Kit. Being a small project it’s perfect for swaps and using up precious scraps… so you could make one for every project!

Flexi Sewing Kit - single and double folded options

Finished Size
   Single   – 3.25” wide x 4.5” high
   Folded – 6.5”    wide x  4.5” high

The Flexi Sewing Kit is an ideal quick project for sewists of all levels. The Flexi Sewing Case will take a little more time but the pattern leads you through each stage step-by-step. It is achievable for all sewists who are comfortable using a sewing machine.

If you are unsure of which hardware and sewing supplies to get for each of these patterns, I have created a shopping list of all products I recommend;

I really hope you’ve enjoyed reading a bit more about my inspiration behind these patterns! And if you do make either of them, don’t forget to tag me so I can see!

S x

Today’s sky::: beautifully sunny!

If you would like monthly news and updates, please sign-up to my newsletter.
To check out my quilt and accessories patterns, visit my Pattern shop.

For my favourite sewing equipment and tools, visit my Amazon store.

The Flexi Sewing Case and Kit patterns are designed for quilting and sewing on the go with a built-in design board and zippered pockets for organising.