Candy Crush: Tips for Sewing a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt

Hello! How are you doing? I was so excited this week to finally be able to share Candy Crush – a Log Cabin Hexie quilt that I made for Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine and is now available in Issue 86.

The making of a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt with hints and tips for making the blocks. Candy Crush is featured in Issue 86 of Love Patchwork & Quilting.

I love making Log Cabin Hexies! The process for making them is very similar to that of making traditional Log Cabin blocks, you just need to add more pieces per round! And Love Patchwork & Quilting is providing handy templates as this months cover gift to make this quilt

If you have never made a log cabin hexie before, please do check out my tutorial How to Sew Log Cabins, just be sure to add on a few more rounds!

The making of a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt with hints and tips for making the blocks. Candy Crush is featured in Issue 86 of Love Patchwork & Quilting.

Tips for making Log Cabin Heaxagons

  • Before sewing, I cut a load of strips for the ‘logs’ and pile them up together next to my sewing machine.
    • The strips will vary in length depending on what I have to hand, but I normally aim for the width of a Fat Quarter.
    • Any shorter strips will be separated out so that I can use them on the earlier ’rounds’ and they don’t get forgotten!
    • TIP: if you struggle with an accurate seam allowance, cut the strips slightly wider and then trim to size once they are sewn on.
  • With any type of log-cabin block, there is lots of stop/start as you sew a strip on, press, trim etc. To minimise this, I tend to;
    • Grab a strip from your pile at random.
    • Sew to one side of the hexagons (if my strips are long enough, I will sometimes sew 2-3 hexies to one strip, leaving a little gap between each of them) by chain-piecing.
    • Snip the threads between each of the hexagons and roughly trim any strips if they are extra long
    • Go to your ironing board, and press all of Piece 1 up, away from the hexagon.
    • On your cutting boards, trim the strips to size using the angles of the hexagon as a guide.
    • Repeat these steps until you have reached the desired size.
Candy Crush - a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt for Love Patchwork & Quilting, Issue 86
  • Possibly the trickiest (scariest?!) thing with making a hexagon quilt by machine is sewing Y-seams! To help with this, mark a 1/4″ in from each corner point with a pencil, sew from one mark to the next. When you are more confident with this, you can lift the presser foot at the end of a seam and pivot the fabric/blocks to make one continuous seam.

Don’t forget to check out my How to Sew Log Cabin Hexies tutorial for more detail.

I was lucky enough to use Ruby Star Society fabrics for this quilt. A charm pack of Clementine for the hexagon centres, and a selection of low volume and brights. Speckled has to be one of my most favourite fabrics in a long time – they are so versatile and some of them even have metallic accents. How amazing is that?!

Candy Crush - a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt for Love Patchwork & Quilting, Issue 86

To accentuate the hexie pattern, I kept the corners angled. I love adding different dimensions to a quilt by playing with the finished shape and binding (you can see how I made a curved edge on my Rainbow Twist quilt).

I can’t wait to get this quilt back to snuggle, I think it’s going to make a perfect picnic blanket!!!

Do you like to play with the finished shape of your quilt?

Speak soon,

S x

Today’s sky::: overcast and grey, and about to rain. Boo!

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The making of a Log Cabin Hexie Quilt with hints and tips for making the blocks. Candy Crush is featured in Issue 86 of Love Patchwork & Quilting.

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2 Comments

  1. I really like this quilt and achieving it with remnants is even better. Very tempted indeed and yes I do live to have a different shaped edge. Thanks Sonia.

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